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Some of my LEGO© MINDSTORMS NXT robots

NXTolaus

NXTolaus

Igor

Igor

NXTitzki

 NXTitzki

Raven

Raven

The Slug

The Slug

 

Remote control 

Remote Control

 

 

NXTolaus

 

Created: December 2012

 

 

 

The NXTolaus is a Christmas robot that can be built with a single LEGO® MINDSTORMS NXT 2.0 set.

When roaming around with a closed bag full of presents, it will detect you with its Ultrasonic sensor. In that case, it will stop, speak some Christmas greetings and open its bag.
Once you have taken out the presents, the NXTolaus will notice that using a hidden touch sensor at the bottom of the bag; it then closes the bag and “walks” away.

 

Building instructions

Building instructions and NXT-G program

 

The building instructions can be used in LEGO Digital Designer.

 

The cables are connected as follows:

  • The motors that drive the tracks: Ports A and C
  • The motor that opens the bag: Port B
  • The touch sensor: Port 2
  • The Ultrasonic sensor: Port 3
  • The color sensor: Port 4

 

 


Igor

 

Created: October 2010

 

Igor is a humanoid robot prototype that I’ve built for LEGOWORLD 2010.

It is controlled by four NXT bricks and features amongst others a color sensor and HiTechnic’s Infrared Seeker Sensor to allow for detection and following of Infrared beacons.

 

 

Building instructions


NXTitzki

 

Created: May 2010

 

 

NXTitzki is a basketball-playing robot that is named after Dirk Nowitzki, a famous German NBA player.
It can be built with one single NXT 2.0 set.

 

 

Building instructions

Building instructions for NXTitzki


Raven

 

Created: February 2009

 

This is a NXT robot based on the Black NXT limited edition: a black raven that can “talk” and (independently) move its head and wings.

Next to a lot of black TECHNIC parts, I used three original NXT motors; as there are no black ones, I spent some effort in both hiding them from the view of the user as well as integrating them into the general scheme of the raven (with the intention not to spoil the overall bird-like appearance).


The Raven also integrates a sound sensor and is programmed presently to react to loud sound events.

 

Building instructions

Building instructions for the Raven


The Slug

 

Created: May 2006

 

 

 

The idea for The Slug appeared to me when I read an article about a small slug-like robot the NASA had developed to send it up to walls or even ceilings.

Though my robot has no phlegm on its “foot” (I presume it could be done but haven’t tried so far), it’s nevertheless mimicking the molluscan “one-foot creeping” and capable of moving in any direction (no walls or ceilings, yet!).

The challenge (and fun) here has been to find a way to get a mobile NXT robot moving in other directions than fore-and-aft when its forward movement is propelled by one single motor only.
My original thought on weight-shifting did not work in connection with “the foot” (though I tried a lot!) , hence I performed some trick with a hidden propeller wheel (an obvious enhancement in this context would be moving the front part of the “foot” laterally).

This project has allowed me to learn a lot about strategies for building a rather complex and concurrently compact and solid NXT robot, alongside with gaining knowledge on different ways of redirecting the torsion of an NXT motor.

Concentrating on the hardware aspects, I’ve kept the program very simple so far, enabling The Slug to creep and to dodge obstacles detected by the touch sensor only.
Future versions of the program may
integrate the light sensor to creep away from bright environments
use the sensors to “investigate” things The Slug encounters.

 


Remote Control

 

Created: November 2011

 

 

This was my third NXT-based remote control.
I built it for controlling the Hubble Telescope NXT model that I displayed at the World Robot Olympiad in Abu Dhabi at November 2011.

Two levers allow for control of a remote model in three dimensions, with three touch sensors for triggering additional functions. A color sensor might be used to display the connection state of the remote control.